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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(Attraction or Tour)
(Attraction or Tour)
(Attraction or Tour)
(Attraction or Tour)
(Attraction or Tour)
(History Article)
Told by Harry Richardson:“After the logs were cut, I would work on the river drives. I’d be down home perhaps a month from the time the logs were out before the rivers opened up. When the ice went off, we got the word to go, because you had to drive the logs when the water was high and the water ran off quick up there.
(History Article)
This article was first presented as a conference paper in 1981.It was published in l’Outaouais:the Proceedings of the Forum on the Regional Identity of Western Quebec by the Institut d’histoire et de recherche sur l’Outaouais (Hull, 1982).
(History Article)
The steamer lands us at the little village of Portage du Fort, at the foot of the series of rapids down which, from over the falls of the Calumet, the Ottawa thunders.
(History Article)
The original logging camps would start a cut by sending out bush rangers – like Cézar Paul for J. R. Booth on the Coulonge – who would determine the cut. Many former loggers give vivid accounts of their experiences in the bush.
(History Article)
Irish Protestants have made their mark in Quebec both in religion and in economic life. The earliest settlers in the Shawville area were Irish Protestants from County Tipperary who came to Quebec after the Napoleonic Wars.
(History Article)
The Canadian fur trade was not only one of the first businesses built on this country’s natural resources, but one that involved both European “discoverers” and native Amerindians. Sixteenth-century fishermen off Newfoundland’s Grand Banks and in the Gulf of St.
(History Article)
Ezra Butler Eddy, a name long synonymous with the City of Hull, was one of that city’s most successful and influential industrialists. A native of Vermont, E. B. Eddy moved to Hull when he was only twenty-four, bringing with him his modest wooden match manufacturing business. With the help of his wife, Zaida, E.
(History Article)
For the greater part of the nineteenth century, Ottawa was claimed to be the lumber capital of Ontario, and perhaps also of Canada.
(History Article)
Summering in the Gatineau has been a pastime for more than a century although, sadly, there is no known record of the first cottage that was built in the valley.
(History Article)
Hot ashes thrown into dry grass in the early afternoon of August 10, 1921, are said to have ignited the fire which started beside Holt’s livery stables, located on the south side of Main Street, just east of Bancroft.
(History Article)
In January 1819, Charles Symmes, aged 20 and living in Massachusetts, wrote to his uncle, Philemon Wright, asking for work. He was hired and arrived a few months later to work as a clerk and bookkeeper.
(History Article)
Spruceholme (204 Principale Street) is the splendid former home of George Bryson Jr. and his wife Helen Craig. Built in 1875, this large stone mansion is said to have been the winter retreat of the Bryson family, who hosted many distinguished guests, including Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the Prime Minister of Canada. Spruceholme is now home to an inn and restaurant.
(History Article)
Driving through the forests and farmland of Pontiac County, one comes upon a large church surrounded by a few houses. Catholic churches in Quebec towns dominate the landscape, but this one is different.The headstones in the adjoining cemetery bear inscriptions such as Doyle, McGuire, Quinn, -- almost all Irish.
(History Article)
Donald Campbell was the founder of Campbell’s Bay. A pioneer farmer, he received his land grant in 1851. He also ran the local saw mill. The coming of the Pontiac Pacific Junction Railway in 1886 gave a boost to the village, and by the 1920s, Campbell’s Bay had become the county seat.
(History Article)
This cheese factory at Stark’s Corners, just east of Portage-du-Fort, is one of many which sprang up in the 1880s and 1890s as the Pontiac shifted from grain crops to dairy farming. This was probably the largest [cheese factory] in the county.
(History Article)
This is one of Chelsea’s four original hotels, all of which were operated by Irishmen in the late 19th century. Built c.1870, it was destroyed by fire in 1900 and rebuilt the next year. It was named for one of its original owners, Johnny Dunn, a former log driver. [Until recently, it was] still an operating hotel in this recreational area north of Hull.
(History Article)
Wakefield, set along a beautiful section of the Gatineau River, has become a getaway place for Ottawa M.P.s. This old house and work shed were built by Robert Earle, a prominent entrepreneur and builder in Wakefield, in the 1880s. Robert let his brother Arthur take over the house as the latter had a larger family.
(History Article)
The E. B. Eddy match factory was set up in 1851 on the site of Philemon Wright’s early settlement (circa 1800) called Wrightsville (Hull). Wright built a saw mill and a grist mill here, and was the first to construct a timber and lumber raft which would sail down the Ottawa River past Montreal to Quebec City.