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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
In 1914, Portage-du-Fort suffered a disastrous fire. Many of the buildings that survived the conflagration were built of solid stone. Perhaps the most imposing of them is the Reid House, built in 1899 by Patrick Ratchford, a stonemason from Portage-du-Fort, for businessman George Emmerson Reid.
(History Article)
One of Wakefield’s most splendid Victorian landmarks is also a bed and breakfast. Now known as Les Trois Érables, the house was for many years referred to as the “Doctors” or the “Geggie” home, after two prominent local doctors who lived there in turn.
(History Article)
In the 18th century, Portage-du-Fort was well established as a fur-trading post. The unnavigable part of the Ottawa River here required a 12-kilometre portage.* This village became the commercial centre of the area with the coming of the steamboat. In 1914, a terrible fire destroyed 80% of the buildings in the village. The stone buildings, this one among them, survived.
(History Article)
Home visits by country doctors began to disappear after the turn of the century when centralized health care developed. Dr. Powles’ house, made of local brick, became Shawville’s first hospital between 1916 and 1920.Marks on the floor of the upper tower room show where the operating table stood.
(History Article)
Norway Bay’s 19th century pier was southern Bristol’s ferry link across the Ottawa River to Sand Point, Ontario, providing a connection to the transcontinental railway until 1963.
(History Article)
The extraordinary brick houses of Shawville, built for bank managers, wealthy merchants, and professionals in the late 19th century, symbolize the entrepreneurial success of many in this town. The excellent clay near Shawville supplied two brickyards, the first opening in 1865.
(History Article)
Farmers depended on the grist mill from the earliest days in the 17th century. During the French Regime, the seigneur was obligated to build a mill for the use of the habitant. Early English-speakers had to depend upon local entrepreneurs to provide them with a facility to grind their grain.
(History Article)
In this age of cement and steel, the massive Marchand covered bridge in Fort Coulonge seems a throwback to an earlier time, a time when building a covered bridge, even one of this magnitude, was a common occurrence.
(History Article)
The Gatineau River has always been an important transportation route. It was well known to the various Indian Nations of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence valleys and it was used extensively as a highway for seasonal travel. It was only in the early 1800s that permanent settlement occurred in the Gatineau Valley. Beginning with the American Philemon Wright’s settlement of Hull in 1800, colonization gradually extended north.
(History Article)
No topographical feature so dominated the landscape and the economy of this area as did the Chaudière Falls. Their presence on the river determined the locations of the cities of Ottawa, Hull and Aylmer, and made necessary the building of the Aylmer Road that bypassed them. The falls fueled the industrial explosion of the mid-1800s by providing the water power for the vast complex of lumber and grist mills that grew up at their foot. They generated the electricity that drove the railroads and factories in the area after 1885.
(History Article)
Poltimore is a picturesque village situated in a valley between the Gatineau and Lièvre Rivers, 32 km north of Gatineau, Quebec and 8 km north of St. Pierre de Wakefield on Route 307. A winding, undulating stretch of road rolls briefly to it before proceeding north to its terminal, Val des Bois.
(History Article)
As the occupation of settlers shifted from farming and working in the shanties to working in whatever industry opened up – often at a considerable distance – the pattern of settlement changed as well. New buildings went up near railways and good roads.
(History Article)
Hull was wracked by several major fires in the 1870s and 1880s. The worst by far, however, was the “Great Fire” of 1900. The following description of that devastating event, printed in the book, Hull 1800-1875, is by an actual eyewitness:
(History Article)
The railway changed much of the valley’s history, as did the paddle-steamers on the Ottawa River. Bridges and dams came next. Until bridges spanned the rivers, the only way to cross was by scow, and only in summer. Just as the steam-operated vessels which plied the Ottawa River between the mid-1830s and the mid-1940s could only operate in summer, so the ferries crossing larger and smaller rivers in the region were also entirely dependent on the season.
(History Article)
In 1805, England was in the midst of a war with Napoleon. A French blockade of the Scandinavian countries denied Britain access to its source of timber. Even after the British naval victory at Trafalgar, Napoleon continued to control continental Europe.
(History Article)
The rigours of travel in the nineteenth century, with poor or even nonexistent roads, dictated the very slow pace at which a traveller could complete the miles he or she needed to go.Distances of approximately three to five miles were all that these rugged souls could achieve either on foot or with horse and wagon before a stop was needed to rest the horse or the body.
(History Article)
Possibly one of the first enterprises of the MacLaren family on acquiring land from [pioneer] Joseph Irwin was the establishment of a general store. This stood facing the Gatineau River, downstream from the [MacLaren] mill complex.
(History Article)
Recent articles by Archie Pennie and Carol Martin in Up the Gatineau! Volumes 21 and 23 have mentioned a connection between Franchot Tone and the Gatineau Fish and Game Club.To many of us old-film buffs, the face of Franchot Tone is a familiar one, but who was grandfather Franchot and what attracted him to Buckingham?The writer’s files on Outaouais mining provide some answers to these questions.
(History Article)
The life of settlers in the Gatineau and Pontiac cannot be imagined without the special dimension it gained from the life and lore of the shanties. At the height of the lumber industry – between 1870 and 1900 – there were dozens of camps run by large companies in both the Pontiac and upper Gatineau. “There were ten thousand men working on the Black and Coulonge rivers alone.
(History Article)
Roads In 1846, a “group of inhabitants residing near the banks of the Gatineau river” sent a petition with 180 signatures to Quebec asking for assistance in the construction of a road going north from Hull for a distance of seventy-five miles (125 kilometres). The request specifically mentioned the need for a bridge over la Pêche River at Wakefield.
(History Article)
A VANISHING PAST
(History Article)
What is heritage? Webster's defines it as "property that is or can be inherited; something handed down from one's ancestors or the past; a characteristic, culture, or tradition."
(History Article)
1.Which of the following is not a community in the Outaouais? a) Fort-Coulonge b) Portage-du-Fort c) Fort Calumet d) Fort William 2. In the 1840s, confusion arose due to the existence of two Aylmers – one in Quebec and one in Ontario. One proposal (which was not adopted) was to change the name of Aylmer, Quebec. The proposed new name was… a) Hull West b) Vanier c) Ottawa d) Toronto
(History Article)
1) c. 2) c. 3) a. 4) b. 5) c. 6) d. 7) a. 8) d. 9) b. 10) b. References: Commission de toponymie du Québec, Noms et Lieux du Québec: dictionnaire illustré, 1996.