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Recently added items

Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
The Buckingham Historical Society has recently published a revised version of its heritage walking tour of the town of Buckingham. The publication, a fold-out pamphlet,is complete with map and full-colour photographs and descriptions of all thirty-four of the heritage sites on the tour. Sites include churches, commercial and other public buildings, industrial buildings, and private residences.
(History Article)
Philemon Wright and the group of settlers who accompanied him to Hull Township in 1800 intended to farm. Like early colonists in many parts of North America, they believed that once the trees were removed, the land would prove to be excellent for farming. Such hopes were unduly optimistic. Crop yields, satisfactory on freshly cleared fields, soon declined as essential soil nutrients were depleted. Wright surveyed the township into lots and came upon the edge of the Canadian Shield in the third range from the Ottawa River.
(History Article)
(Continued from Part 1)
(History Article)
The workers were mostly French-speakers; the craftsmen included many Scandinavians skilled in log construction; and the architect was Harold Lawson. In 1930, they built here the largest log structure in the world.
(History Article)
From the time of Philemon Wright’s settlement around the Chaudière Falls in 1800, the rapid and difficult course of the Gatineau River discouraged logging along its length and also served as a barrier to canoes and boats attempting to travel upriver.
(History Article)
It was close to midnight on a warm July evening in 1984 when flames seared the sky in one of the worst fires that West Quebec has ever seen. It was caused by arson, a gasoline-soaked car pushed onto the east side of Wakefield’s historic wooden covered bridge and torched, turning the tinder-dry, 70-year-old structure to a roaring inferno within seven minutes.
(History Article)
(History Article)
Easy access to clay and limestone in Clarendon made bricks and mortar a logical venture. Clarendon lime kilns were built as early as the 1860s and many bricks were made by hand. In 1888, while there were a few brick industries already in operation in Shawville, two additional brickyards were set up in Clarendon.
(History Article)
The saw and grist mills were the first commercial ventures in Clarendon.
(History Article)
With the abandonment of the up and down river steamboat service in 1879, the fate of river ports was definitely in doubt. Nowhere was this uncertainty felt more than in Pontiac’s largest village, Portage du Fort. The village had been incorporated in 1836 and by 1844 advertisements for building lots appeared in Ottawa newspapers.
(History Article)
In Memory of Chelsea’s Historic Cemeteries: Stories of the Old Chelsea Protestant Burial Ground, Chelsea Pioneer Cemetery, St. Stephen’s Cemetery, and Chelsea’s Homestead Plots Here is a historical book with a difference. It traces the story of Chelsea’s community development in relation to its well-preserved cemeteries and the people buried in them.
(History Article)
Incorporation and Construction The railway line to Maniwaki was incorporated in 1871 under Quebec Statute as the Ottawa and Gatineau Valley Railroad Company to build “from or near the village of Hull to a point at or near the confluence of the Desert and Gatineau Rivers,” (Maniwaki). Included in the first Board of Directors were such prominent Gatineau Valley individuals as E.B. Eddy, Alonzo Wright, John MacLaren, Andrew Pritchard, and Patrick Farrel.
(History Article)
1. Which of the following is NOT an island in the Ottawa River? a) Ile-aux-Allumettes. b) Ile-du-Grand-Calumet. c) Ile-Morrison. d) Ile-Quyon. 2. Which of the following is NOT a municipality in the Pontiac? a) Bristol. b) Mansfield-et-Pontefract. c) Kazabazua. d) Litchfield.
(History Article)
1) d. (No such island). 2) c. (Kazabazua is in the Gatineu Valley). 3) b. 4) c. (Pinus resinosa, or Norway pine, as the early pioneers called it). 5) d. 6) b. 7) c. (Les Oblats de Marie-Immaculée had a mission here). 8) c. 9) a. 10) b. (Bryson lost its title to a booming Campbell's Bay in 1926).
(History Article)
--May 16, 2007The Pontiac Museum, which is located at the Fairgrounds in Shawville, and which is run by the volunteer Pontiac Historical Society, needs your help! The museum is housed in the former Shawville railway station, which was built in 1886 by the Pontiac Pacific Junction Railway. Home to the museum since 1976, the former station is now in need of repair.
(History Article)
The earliest settlers in the Shawville area were Irish Protestants from County Tipperary who came to Canada after the Napoleonic Wars ended in 1815. Many had first settled in the Carp Valley on the Upper Canada side of the Ottawa River. Local lore tells us that Thomas Hodgins, John Dale and his wife Elizabeth set out from this colony in the summer of 1821 to search for new land to settle. It is believed they paddled up the river, landing in a small bay some forty miles upriver. The two men then set off northward in search of a suitable place to homestead.
(History Article)
Lumbering and farming attracted the first settlers to Campbell’s Bay, which was incorporated as a municipality in 1904. E.H. Workman was the first mayor. The village was named after Lieut. Donald Campbell, a soldier in the Scottish Regiment, who was granted a large amount of land. The main drag, Front Street, is unique in that its buildings are on one side of the street only, giving everyone a majestic view of the Ottawa River.
(History Article)
The village of Bryson was named after the honorable John Bryson, MP for Pontiac. Incorporated in 1873, its first mayor was Walter Rimer. Located on the banks of the Ottawa River, Bryson was an inland port for passengers and freight heading north-west-ward during the era of steamships. Near Bryson, there are ruins of an old grist mill. People came from as far away as Fort Coulonge to have their grain milled.
(History Article)
Located on the Ottawa River, Calumet Island was for many years the meeting place of the Algonquin people. During the French Régime, Calumet Island, like the rest of the Ottawa River, was a link in the western route to the Great Lakes (via the Mattawa River, Lake Nipissing and the French River up to the Georgian Bay).
(History Article)
One of the original five municipalities in Pontiac, Litchfield was erected on November 20, 1846, with Alfred Lancaster as its first mayor. In December of the following year, the first meeting of the district of the 3rd Division of Ottawa County was held at the home of Samuel Morehead on Highway 148. Today the house is the home of Dawson Morehead. In 1964 the Pontiac County Council (now Pontiac MRC) built its headquarters in Litchfield, on Highway 148 at the edge of Campbell's Bay.
(History Article)
The Municipality of Leslie was incorporated in 1860 as a part of Thorne, under the mayorship of James Martin. Seven years later the township broke away and was joined with Clapham, with George Palmer as mayor. In 1876 Huddersfield joined the other two, with the first mayor of the united townships being Francis Pelletier.
(History Article)
The municipality of Waltham was named after a village near Grimsby in England. Incorporated as a municipality in 1859, Waltham's first mayor was John T. Coghlan. By 1859, the Township of Bryson, named after George Bryson, amalgamated with Waltham. The town of Waltham was the terminus of the PPJ railway line and later the Canadian Pacific railway. Built in 1887, the railway offered a direct means of travel between the Upper Pontiac and Ottawa. The train would arrive in Waltham in the evening, and leave the next morning for Ottawa. The railway was vital for the region.
(History Article)
Rapides des Joachims was originally a mission post on the Upper Ottawa River, where an early Hudson's Bay Post was established at the foot of the long rapids. By 1871 it had become a small village doing considerable lumber business. The river steamers called there because it was, at that time, the head of navigation on the Ottawa.
(History Article)
The magnificent stands of white pine located in Bristol township attracted the first settlers in the early 1800's. The municipality of Bristol - located in the south-east corner of Pontiac - was incorporated in 1846, with William Craig as its first mayor. The iron ore deposits, here, where first mined from 1872 to 1894. In 1956, the owners of Hilton Mines constructed the new open pit mining and processing facilities.
(History Article)
The municipalities of Alleyn and Cawood boast of many beautiful lakes and rivers. Fishing and hunting are excellent, and there are very good snowmobile trails. Danford Lake, located at the intersection of Hwy. 301 and the Harrison/Cawood Road in the north-east end of Pontiac, is the main village. The municipality was erected in 1877. Its first mayor was Robert J.Bradnor. The original settlers, who were mostly of Irish descent, worked in the lumber industry.