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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
Originally this was an inn and stopping place for Ottawa River travellers. It is believed to have been originally owned by André Galipeau, who was active in parish, school and municipal affairs. Indeed, the inn served as a meeting place for the local village council until other public buildings became available.
(History Article)
In stories about death, funerals and wakes have a special place. Georges Newberry of Calumet Island heard this story from his old parents:
(History Article)
The Wake of Dan O’Brien The Irish tradition of the wake is not only a special family reunion in honour of the dead: it is also a period of transition. Those who died are not quite out of this world, and not quite in the next. Clifford Robillard described one such wake:
(History Article)
The City of Gatineau, in collaboration with the Aylmer Heritage Association, has released a new publication spotlighting the treasures of Aylmer’s Old Village. “Heritage Walking Tour of Aylmer’s Old Village,” the title of the publication, is a lavishly illustrated, full-colour fold-out brochure written by Enid Page, one of the leading lights at the Aylmer Heritage Association.
(History Article)
1) In 1873, Shawville became a separate municipality. Out of which township was it created? a) Carleton. b) Clarendon. c) Clarence. d) Shaw. 2) Which group was the first to settle in the Shawville area? a) Irish Catholics from County Wexford. b) Irish Protestants from County Tipperary. c) Scottish Presbyterians from Lowland Scotland. d) German Loyalists from Upstate New York..
(History Article)
1) b) 2) b) 3) b) 4) c) 5) c) 6) d) 7) c) 8) a) 9) a) 10) c)
(History Article)
Christ Church Aylmer is Aylmer's oldest original church building. The church's foundation stone was laid in 1843. Our long history reflects the history of Aylmer itself. This page outlines the history of Aylmer and the church, starting in the 17th century. The Ottawa Valley (Eastern Ontario and Western Québec, commonly called l’Outaouais) was an important trading route in the history of the development of Canada. Fur traders used the Ottawa River to get into the hinterland to trade for fur goods.
(History Article)
Toponymy is the study of place names. Herewith is a short list of Gatineau places and how they received their names… Gatineau The Gatineau River and the City of Gatineau were named after Nicholas Gatineau dit Duplessis, notary of Trois Rivières, Quebec. In about 1650, Gatineau tired of the hum-drum life and, wishing to return to his beloved France, turned to hunting and trapping on the Gatineau River to gather the needed cash for his voyage home. Gatineau did not realize his dream; legend tells us that he drowned in the river that now bears his name.
(History Article)
The Equity, Pontiac’s only bilingual weekly, has been “the voice of the Pontiac” since 1883. Smith and Cowan started the paper in Bryson. After a number of moves, its present location is the 1850s Shawville Academy building. Its mandate is to report regional news for the people of Pontiac County.
(History Article)
Thanksgiving Day, October 18, 1900, was a beautiful autumn day in the Ottawa area. The weather was sunny but cool, with a temperature about 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The trees in the Gatineau Hills were ablaze in their autumn colours.
(History Article)
The word “bootlegging” apparently came into general use in the American Midwest in the 1880s. It denoted the practice of concealing flasks of illicit liquor in boot tops when going to trade with Indians.
(History Article)
THE GATINEAU
(History Article)
For over 150 years, a general store was operated by the Thomson family at the corner of Victoria and Galipeau Streets, the main east-west and north-south crossroads in the very centre of the village of Thurso. History passed by its doorstep and the news of its inhabitants could be heard within its doors.
(Organization)
(Organization)