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Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(History Article)
The young boy was standing in front of a small wooden table on which laid a birthday cake with four lit candles. You could see the gleam in the little guy’s face, and his underlying smile of knowing that this was his day to be celebrated, and his day alone. Dressed in a clean white shirt, dark slacks, and a clip-on bow tie, we could sense what he was thinking as he continued his bright-eyed stare into the candles. We could almost feel his wonder at what other miracles life would bring, and that this birthday was certainly one of them.
(Attraction or Tour)
(Attraction or Tour)
(History Article)
The publication, Cemetery Heritage in Quebec: A Handbook , is still available.
(History Article)
The historical development of the Outaouais has often found its origin in the Pontiac. It is within the Pontiac where the oldest traces of human artefacts were discovered, shortly after the retreat of the Champlain Sea. Archaeological discoveries found on Morrison Island revealed that the river in the Pontiac had become “the copper route”, starting from the Great Lakes and leading up to Eastern Quebec.
(Organization)
(History Article)
Les Publications du Québec has just released a new book, titled Les ponts couverts du Québec. Produced in association with Quebec’s Ministry of Transport, the book is the first comprehensive study of the covered bridge phenomenon in the province.
(History Article)
In Canada, heritage sites may be designated nationally, provincially and municipally. The level of designation depends on the level of significance of the site. National Historic Sites must be judged to be of national significance; provincial, of provincial significance, and so on.
(Map)
(Source - Tourisme Outaouais)
(Map)
(Source - Tourisme Outaouais)
(Map)
(Source - Tourisme Outaouais)
(Map)
(Source - Guide touristique 2005-2006, Vallée de la Gatineau)
(Image)
The Paddy Fleming ferry on the Cantley side of the river. In Kirk's day, most ferry services were on the west side of the river. By the early 1900s, however, Fleming was ferrying west bank residents to the blacksmith shop and grist mill in Cantley. Ferry traffic was heaviest at train times. Among those seen in this photo are (probably) assistant ferryman Jack O'Connell, the man in the white shirt holding the oar, and Minnie McAllister, who is shading her eyes with her hand. --Gatineau Valley Historical Society
(Image)
The man in the white shirt is pulling the scow along the elevated cable and the man behind him appears to be adjusting the chain. People in this neighbourhood would whistle for someone to come an get them in the ferry, or they would take a rowboat across the river to bring the scow back. --Gatineau Valley Historical Society