Skip to main content

Recently added items

Below is a list of all the recently added content, ordered from newest to oldest.

(Image)
(Image)
(Image)
Built around 1875, this bridge spanned the Lièvre River. Note the covered sidewalk and uneven portal.
(Image)
This 5-span bridge measured an astounding 720 feet (219 metres). Built across the Gatineau River in 1928, it survived until 1948.
(Image)
Built in 1926 and surviving until 1953, this bridge had three spans and measured an impressive 525 feet (160 metres) -- longer than any covered bridge in Quebec today.
(Image)
Built in 1931, the Savoyard Bridge in Grand-Remous spans the Gatineau River just above the rapids. Built in two spans and measuring 239 feet (72 metres), this bridge survives to this date and is a popular local attraction. Its dazzling red paint makes it a splendid sight, especially in winter.
(Image)
The Marchand Bridge at Fort Coulonge is arguably Quebec's longest covered bridge. Built across the Coulonge River, its six spans total 499 feet (152 metres). Built in 1898, the bridge still stands, and is a registered heritage site.
(Image)
The Gendron Bridge, on the Gatineau River, was one of the most photographed in the region. Arsoned in 1984, it was re-built from scratch in 1997, using donated materials and volunteer labour. Traffic across the new span is limited to pedestrians and cyclists.
(Image)
One of the most picturesque covered bridges in the region, the Meech Creek Bridge (built in 1924) measures only 65 feet (19 metres). Its pastoral setting add to its charm.
(Image)
This town hall, originally a post office and federal building, was built in 1927
(Image)
This house served as a hospital during the 1920s.
(Image)
G. F. Hodgins ran one of the local brickyards that produced Shawville's distinctive red brick.
(Image)
Pontiac Lodge No. 40.
(Image)
Decorative wood trim is a feature of many of the buildings in Shawville.
(Image)
The trim on this balcony adds a touch of elegance to an otherwise plain house.